Speakerplans.com Homepage
Forum Home Forum Home > General > 12v Powered Systems
  New Posts New Posts RSS Feed - Boominator MINI (development thread)
  FAQ FAQ  Forum Search   Events   Register Register  Login Login

Boominator MINI (development thread)

 Post Reply Post Reply Page  <1 969798
Author
Message
 Rating: Topic Rating: 4 Votes, Average 4.00  Topic Search Topic Search  Topic Options Topic Options
Saturnus View Drop Down
Old Croc
Old Croc


Joined: 13 July 2010
Location: Copenhagen
Status: Offline
Points: 2006
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Saturnus Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 June 2018 at 3:01pm
Originally posted by protos protos wrote:

Saturnus what do you mean by high frequency "ringing"?

All sounds are basically made up of a multiple of frequencies. These have different individual ADSR (attack decay sustain release) parameters. By adjusting the sustain and release parameters you can compensate for in-room ringing due to sound at higher frequencies bouncing off walls indoors to make a small and typically "hard" sounding room more "soft", and the reverse when outdoors where there's no resonances in the high frequency range which makes it more "soft". That's great if you're using piezos however as they outdoors can sound quite tolerable but for accurate sound reproduction it's typically a good idea to mimic what the intended listening room was when the recording was made. And that will typically be a normal living room.


Edited by Saturnus - 14 June 2018 at 3:02pm
Back to Top
protos View Drop Down
Registered User
Registered User


Joined: 23 November 2017
Status: Offline
Points: 28
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote protos Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 June 2018 at 7:51am
I thought you meant tweeter resonances. Room echo in an untreated room typically makes the sound harder rather than softer unless there are a lot of furnishings curtains and carpets which will absorb HF content.
Outdoors obviously there is no room reinforcement in the bass plus no HF bouncing of any hard surface so in principle there is a roll off at both ends. But a normal EQing should solve this.I understand the psychoacoustic bass synthesizing principle but I don't get how HF ringing is adjusted un less it is the same principle. Unless you introduce ringing digitally by dela ying the fundamental by a few microseconds and adding it to the signal.Do you have a link?


Edited by protos - 15 June 2018 at 7:58am
Back to Top
Saturnus View Drop Down
Old Croc
Old Croc


Joined: 13 July 2010
Location: Copenhagen
Status: Offline
Points: 2006
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Saturnus Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 June 2018 at 8:53am
What I'm doing is applying the same principles as linkwitz transform but to higher frequencies instead of lower frequencies. Linkwitz transform basically transforms the natural Q of the speaker to something you select. Typically this is done to make it possible for a small speaker enclosure to have better low frequency capability. But if you have different settings you can switch between, you can set the Q and the low frequency response to suit different room sizes to take maximum advantage of the room gain, or lack thereof.

You can apply the same principles to higher frequencies as well by adjusting the linkwitz transform formula to work with higher frequencies instead of lower frequencies if you combine it with a peaking filter  to compensate for the high frequency drop off. The peaking filter is key as you need to have a relatively flat frequency response to a fixed frequency, typically 20KHz, regardless of what the (high frequency) Q is adjusted to.

Naturally, this is a very basic method of doing this as it can be done with just 2 parametric bi-quads but it works really well when you have a few discrete predefined settings that is fine tuned by ear. For the DSP to calculate the settings on the fly would be an absolute nightmare.

The reason this method is far better than just using an EQ to adjust for the room resonances is that EQ'ing doesn't solve the underlying problem. By EQ'ing you just adjust the overall response of the speaker to compensate for room resonances. However, by adjusting the Q you make the high frequency response harder or softer from the speaker itself which affects the room resonances as well.

I don't have a link to my own research, no.


Edited by Saturnus - 15 June 2018 at 9:41am
Back to Top
 Post Reply Post Reply Page  <1 969798
  Share Topic   

Forum Jump Forum Permissions View Drop Down

Forum Software by Web Wiz Forums® version 12.01
Copyright ©2001-2018 Web Wiz Ltd.

This page was generated in 0.109 seconds.