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Crossover Capacitor Peavey

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mitchiemasha View Drop Down
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    Posted: 10 February 2022 at 4:53pm
Peavey crossover I believe has a duff capacitor, big bulge, tweeter very quiet but works fine test out of circuit.

The rating is 1.8j what is this in uf? what tolerance are we looking at? I'm struggling to find a simple correct calculation or the actual same part.




Thank you


Edited by mitchiemasha - 10 February 2022 at 4:54pm
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Lucasdude View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Lucasdude Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 February 2022 at 4:58pm
I believe J is +/-5% tolerance.


I think this is the right one, but maybe someone else can confirm? It's probably worth changing the same one in the other speaker crossover so they sound the same!


Edited by Lucasdude - 10 February 2022 at 5:06pm
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madboffin View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote madboffin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 February 2022 at 9:54pm
That is the correct replacement. Plastic film, 1.8uF 10% 250V.

Shame that the postage cost is several times that of the component but that's how thngs are...

They are normally very reliable but if one has failed you could change both while you're at it, for peace of mind.

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mitchiemasha View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote mitchiemasha Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 February 2022 at 3:32am
I was looking at Blue Aran and noticed that a

225J is 2.2uf
335J is 3.3uf
475J is 4.7uf
106J is 10uf

This is what threw me so asked here. Following that shouldn't the capacitor on the board be noted as 185J? Actually, I didn't realise the last number changed until typing, presuming the 5 might be the tolerance number or something. There's a correlation to the decimal place and the last number. If it's a 6J it's a straight translation, if it's a 5J the decimal shifts (is added). Making that last number be it's "prefix, decimal place, to the power of" (or whatever's the correct way to describe it). The J being the +/-5% tolerance by itself, nothing to do with the 5 in front of it.

6J
106J is 10uf
226J is 22uf
156J is 15uf

5J
225J is 2.5uf
335J is 3.3uf
475J is 4.7uf
685J is 6.8uf
185J is 1.8uf
275J is 2.7uf

I'm now confident, the 185J (1.8uf) is the 1 and the capacitor on the boards code scheme is a straight translation 1.8J being 1.8uf.

Always over complicating things but I had to be sure. Thank you
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madboffin View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote madboffin Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 February 2022 at 2:45pm
Yes, the third figure indicates the decimal multiplier, or the number of zeroes after the significant figures. In this case the value is marked in picofarads, 1 800 000 pF = 1.8 microfarads.

This is a common way of labelling electronic components, for example 185 on a resistor would be 1 800 000 ohms (generally described as 1.8 megohms). A lot of components use a standard colour code to represent the numbers - look up "electronic colour code " on Google for more info.

Capacitors can be confusing, they might be labelled in microfarads (uF) nanofarads (nf) or picofafads (pf). But if they just have three figures, it's picofarads. So you were right to ask questions and make sure.




Edited by madboffin - 11 February 2022 at 2:49pm
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