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A Recone Guide

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Topic: A Recone Guide
Posted By: norty303
Subject: A Recone Guide
Date Posted: 14 August 2009 at 1:06pm
As hinted at previously, one of our more knowledgable members has kindly put together a very comprehensive recone guide for your delectation and delight.  Not sure yet which forum this should live in, or if indeed it warrants an all forums announcement, but will ceertainly be added to the Technical Classics.
Anyway, enough of my waffle:
 
A Re-cone Guide

Read through the full instructions before starting to ensure you know what order you need to do things.

The re-coning thing isn't too hard the main requirement is care and cleanliness. General rules ; Handle the cone assembly with extreme care, it's very easy to damage.

Avoid getting any dirt or particles down inside the voice coil gap, turning  the speaker upside down and shake it whilst gently blowing often helps (keeping your eyes shut to avoid injury)

 

Some background info.

 
Types of loudspeaker

As far as re-cone kits are concerned there are a few possibilities

A: Single suspension, comes as a cone/coil/suspension assembly

B: Double suspension, comes as  a cone/coil/suspension assembly

C: Single suspension, comes as a coil suspension assembly and a separate cone

D: Double suspension, comes as a coil suspension assembly and a separate cone

E: Single suspension, comes as separate coil, suspension, cone

 
Contents

Step 1 Pre stripping out checks

Step 2 Stripping out the old software

Step 3 Stripping out the old software

Step 4 Cleaning out the hardware

Step 5 Doing a dry build

Step 6 Gluing and fitting the new software

Step 7 Gluing and fitting the new software

Step 8 Gluing and fitting the new software

Step 9 Fitting gaskets

Step 10 Fitting gaskets

Step 11 Electrical connections

Step 12 Dust-cap fitting

Step 13 Dust-cap fitting

Step 14 Dust-cap fitting

Step 15 Final electrical connections

Step 16 Testing

 

Appendix 1 Shims, what to do if they are too tight/loose or missing

Appendix 2 What to do if the coil and suspension don’t come glued together

Appendix 3 Stripping out double suspension speakers

Appendix 4 If the gasket supplied is of the strip type and not segments

Appendix 5 Separate cone and suspension assemblies

 

 

Step 1: Pre stripping out checks Before starting to strip out the old software there are a couple of things to take note of and possibly a picture or two. It is well worth cutting the old parts out carefully and as complete as possible, this will allow you to use this as a reference when re-coning later. It is well worth checking that the parts you have received look like the parts you are about to strip out and if not checking with the supplier.

            A: There are often flexible connections from the moving parts of the speaker (back of cone? to chassis connectors) these are very common on single suspension units and smaller coil double suspension units. Take careful note of the length of the loop, this will be critical later. Try moving the cone as far as it will go in each direction and note the effect on the tinsel loop. The wires must not pull tight at any time but should not be so long as to be able to touch each other

            B: Which way around is the dust-cap fitted, they are usually pointing out (convex) but sometimes concave.

            C: If the cone/coil/suspension are not glued together in the kit you have received then note which way up the suspension goes (first/outer roll up or down)

            D: Is the dust-cap fitted with a hard or soft glue, lead guitar speakers often use a soft glue whereas pro PA speakers most often use a hard glue.

 

Step 2; Stripping out the old software Remove all of the old cone assembly. First cut around the cone edge and the suspension (AKA spider, damper), cut the braids and lift the old cone assembly out. As soon as the coil is out, cover the gap with masking tape to prevent dirt entering into the magnet assembly. Next remove all traces of the surround and suspension from the chassis. The aim is to get a smooth / even surface on the rim of the housing and the platform for the suspension. Solvents such as acetone, MEK, Cellulose thinners or automotive type gasket remover can all help soften the old glues otherwise they can be scraped off with a sharp knife. For double suspension units see appendix 3.

 

Step 3: Stripping out the old software Remove the old lead-out wires (Tinsel/braid/Litz wire) form the connectors on the chassis, usually this connection is soldered. Take care with the solder tags as they can be fragile and new ones are often not supplied with a re-cone kit.

 

Step 4; Cleaning out the hardware Blow all the loose dust from the surface, a hand/foot pump (car/pushbike type) can be useful here. Wipe over the housing with a cloth to ensure it is clean. Remove the tape from the magnet gap. Roll a piece of masking tape into a tube sticky side out, then flatten it and gently push it into the magnet assembly gap. Slide it round to collect any dirt or filings within the gap. Check visually (use a torch or bright lamp) that there are no particles visible in the narrow circular channel where the voice coil will sit. This is where great care is required the smallest piece of magnetic dirt left behind will cause a nasty coil rub, so the message keep on cleaning.

            It the speaker has some sort of mesh/gauze fitted in the centre pole then this may have become partially blocked and require cleaning with some sort of solvent. Failure to do this could cause the repaired speaker to burn out as hot air cannot vent properly. If the speaker has a foam type bung this may also have become partially blocked over tiem and should be cleaned

 

Step 5: Doing a dry build Do a dry build before thinking about glue, fit the centering shim/shims (if none were supplied see appendix 1)  evenly around the gap. Gently lower the re-cone kit over the shims, if it feels tight then stop and adjust the shims see appendix 1. Once in place observe that all of the shims feel even when gently moved, this will be essential in making sure the assembly is correctly centered when the glue is used. Note how the lead-out wires need to be evenly aligned relative to the chassis connectors, again this will be important when the glue is applied and will not be easily adjusted once the glue starts to go off. Note at this stage that with the re-cone assembly fitted and the surround resting on the chassis, the relationship between the inner and outer parts of the surround is the same all round the circumference. If you ‘slide’ the cone over to one side the inner part of the surround will be higher than the outer one side and lower at the other. This is a tilted cone and bad news, take note as when the glue is on the assembly needs to be even all around and once the glue grabs hold it will not be easy to move it. Note the inner and outer rolls do not necessarily need to be level with each other but it is important that they are level/higher/lower evenly all around. It is worth noting at this stage where the cone surround sits on the chassis and especially where the suspension sits (as there are often a number of lands and you really want to put the glue on the right one).

Note: Handle the cone assembly with extreme care ! The coil can be easily made oval by even gentle squeezing. This will render it useless.

            Remove the re-cone assembly and have one last check of the magnet gap, dirt in gap is the enemy of all speaker assembly.

 

Types of re-cone kit For Types C&D above it is best to fit the coil suspension assembly first, get that in nicely and with the shims feeling even all around the gap before fitting the cone. With double suspension assemblies especially bolted in types it is well worth running the unit at low power to check it is not rubbing. If it rubs try loosening the bolts and tightening them in a different order, or in extreme cases opening the holes in the double suspension assembly up a bit with a drill. Bolts should always be tightened working opposites never working around in a circle.

What type of gasket came with the re-cone kit you received? If you have segments then proceed as below, if you have a strip type gasket then refer to appendix 4 before proceeding with gluing.

           

Step 6; Gluing and fitting the new software Place the coil centering shims/shims upright in the magnet gap and evenly spaced (if there are more than 1) Make sure the shims are evenly spaced (they are used to keep the coil central as the glues dry)

 

Step 7; Gluing and fitting the new software Apply a suitable glue evenly around the suspension platform (or the suspension foot if it does not sit on a platform) and around the housing rim (For separate suspension and cone surround assemblies see appendix 5), taking care to put the glue on the right lands to match the re-cone kit (manufacturers do change designs so it is not always the land the old parts came from). This should come to the inside edge of the rim, but be a thin coat so it doesn't squeeze out under the surround.

 

Step 8: Gluing and fitting the new software Gently lower the re-cone assembly over the shims making sure they are all inside the coil (none are outside the coil), and gently ease the cone assembly into the glue beads, don’t push it in too far allowing it to be sunken, the suspension should be slightly dished in. At this stage, depending on the nature of the glue being used you don’t have much time.

Note: Handle the cone assembly with extreme care ! The coil can be easily made oval by even gentle squeezing. This will render it useless.

 

A: Check the lead out braids are facing the chassis connectors

B: Check that the surround is even all the way around (as detailed in step 5 doing a dry build)

B: Check the shims feel even all round and not tighter one side than the other, if they are gently try pushing the coil into the gap and letting it ‘bounce back or ease the assembly over to even the feel of the shims.

 

 

 

Step 9; Fitting gaskets Using the same glue, apply an even layer to the 4 front gasket segments, and stick them down to the housing rim on top of the cone edge. Ensure they clear the screw holes!

            Note if your gasket is of the strip type then see appendix 4

 

Step 10; Fitting gaskets Place a flat board on top of the speaker, ensuring the board will rest on the gasket segments and not touch the surround. Check that the gaskets are still right out to the edge, and haven't slipped inward. It will be too late when the glue has dried! Add some weight on it (e.g. a couple of phone directories), and leave overnight to dry.

 

Step 11: Electrical connections There will be electrical connections to be made next, these vary between manufacturer’s typically the tinsel/braid needs to be soldered to the chassis connectors and if your re-cone kit was of type C,D or E then there could be voice coil wires to be soldered to the tinsel/braid where it is fitted to the cone. At this stage it is best to only solder connections which will lie under the dust-cap. When soldering especially near the voice coil take care that nothing falls into coil. 

 

Step 12; Dust-cap fitting When the glue is dry, carefully remove the shims from the coil. Check the gap for and debris as this is your last chance, once the dust-cap is on it’s too late.

 

Step 13; Dust-cap fitting Fold a piece of masking tape into a 'T shape, and stick to the dust cap to form a handle to hold the cap by. Place the cap centrally on the cone, and use a very soft pencil to draw a faint line around it to act as a guide for gluing. NB DO not push the pencil onto the cone, it is less than 0.5mm thick, and made of paper !

 

Step 14; Dust-cap fitting If the dust-cap has a foot where it glues to the cone then the glue is best applied to the foot then fitted to the speaker. Apply an even bead of a glue to the dust-cap foot using a small paintbrush, stick or spatula, and place the cap on the cone using your pencil guide to get it central. Use just enough glue to squeeze 1-2mm out from the foot all round. Leave to dry until the glue has cured. A small weight may be used to ensure the dust-cap sits firmly onto the cone.

            It the dust-cap does not have a foot then it is best to put the dust-cap in place, hold it down with a small weight and then apply a bead of glue. Apply an even bead of a glue half on the dust-cap and half on the cone. The amount of glue required increases with coil diameter/power handling and reduces with increasing frequency range. So subs maybe 6mm wide bead, mid/highs 2mm wide. You can use the old software as a guide to the amount of glue required. Leave to dry until the glue has cured.

            Remove the masking tape once the glue has cured

 

Step 15: Final electrical connections If the tinsel/braid wires come from a moving part (typically single suspension units and some double suspension units the wires come off the back of the cone) then the ‘loop’ of tinsel is critical. It is best to put the tinsel/braid in place setting a loop such that the wires cannot touch each other and secure without soldering. Next try moving the cone back and forth (carefully so as not to damage anything) and observe if the wires pull tight at full excursion, if they do the loop is too short. Note this needs to be done with the glues cured. Once a suitable loop length has been set then the connections can be soldered.

 

Step 16: Testing

 

 

           

 

Appendix 1 Shims

If the shims are not supplied or seem too tight then use card or similar, these need to be the same thickness all round the gap, they may be made up of different thickness bits but each ‘set’ must be the same thickness otherwise the coil will be off center. The aim is to have as few gaps between the shims as possible however sometimes removing 1 set and re-spacing the rest is the only way to get a good fit. What you don’t want are big gaps between the shims as this will lead to an out of round coil. The coil needs to be a snug fit over the shims, too loose leads to off centre coils, too tight and you risk deforming the coil when fitting it.

 

Appendix 2 Setting the coil height

For type E above you will need to set the height of the coil in the gap, the aim here is for the coil to be positioned such that the amount of coil above the top/front plate is the same as below. This is not easy as you can’t see the bottom side, the way to proceed is a combination of matching the old parts you removed (IE distance from bottom of suspension to start of coil winds) and measuring the thickness of the top/front plate thickness (at the centre if the plate is not the same thickness all the way across) and setting the coil equally about this thickness. If you know the mathematical Xmax (coil wind length-front plate thickness)/2 then this is the amount of coil which needs to be set above the front plate. Note not all manufacturers use mathematical Xmax in their datasheets, often however they do state the front plate thickness and the wind length of the coil. Once you have worked out the position for the coil, fit it in the gap with the shims holding it in place and mark the coil on the inside with the correct height (line level with the top of the centre pole). Fit the suspension over the coil and lower it into the magnet gap, adjust the coil within the suspension to align the height (using the mark you made earlier to ensure correct setting) Glue the coil to suspension and allow to cure.

 

Appendix 3 Stripping out double suspension units

Some speakers are dual or double suspension, in this case there will be some sort of spacer ring holding the suspensions apart, this will be part of your re-cone kit and so the old spacer needs to be removed from the chassis. Often these spacer rings are glued to the chassis, a wood chisel may be put at the joint with the chassis and tapped gently with a hammer to separate them. If it is bolted in then you have been lucky, simply un-bolt it. If you damage the chassis land when removing the spacer it will need to be filled and filed flat so that the new coil suspension assembly sits in place flat.     

 

 

Appendix 4 If the gasket supplied is of the strip type

If the front gasket is of the strip type then don’t fit it at the same time as the cone surround is glued in. instead use a soft, blunt ended (piece of wood shaped like a scraper) to rub the surround into the glue. This should be done every few minutes and with gradually increasing pressure until the glue has grabbed the surround. At the same time the suspension should be rubbed into it’s glue, you will probably find your fingers best for this. Make sure when rubbing down:

            A: You don’t sink or tilt the assembly

            B: You don’t rub through or otherwise damage the surround

 

Appendix 5 Separate cone and suspension assemblies

For re-cone kit types types C,D and E as detailed above the coil/suspension assembly should be fitted first and so only apply the suspension to chassis glue (no glue if it is a bolted in assembly)

            A: Check the lead out braids are facing the chassis connectors.

B: Check the shims feel even all round and not tighter one side than the other, if they are gently try pushing the coil into the gap and letting it ‘bounce back, making sure it ends up only slightly ‘dished’ not excessively sunk or ease the assembly over to even the feel of the shims.

Allow the glue to grab,

With double suspension assemblies especially bolted in types it is well worth running the unit at low power to check it is not rubbing. If it rubs try loosening the bolts and tightening them in a different order, or in extreme cases opening the holes in the double suspension assembly up a bit with a drill. Bolts should always be tightened working opposites never working around in a circle.

            Apply a suitable glue evenly around the surround land. This should come to the inside edge of the rim, but be a thin coat so it doesn't squeeze out under the surround. Note which way the cone has to align for the tinsel/braid wires to align with the chassis connectors.

 Lower the cone surround over the coil, ensuring that if there are coil wires sticking up to be soldered to the tinsel wires in the cone that they are on the inside of the cone neck not out of site underneath. It is important to lower the cone as level as possible, if it is tilted then glue may pick up on the rear of the moving part of the surround, this will cause at best edge ticks and at worst reduce the life of the speaker

            A: Check the cone tinsel/braid wires align evenly with the chassis connectors

                                    Now return to step 9



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Replies:
Posted By: jonny4288
Date Posted: 15 August 2009 at 2:41pm
I would suggest technical classics?
 
Great guide


Posted By: nomis
Date Posted: 15 August 2009 at 3:32pm
Thumbs Up


Posted By: Ryan94
Date Posted: 16 August 2009 at 9:04pm
thanks for this it will help alot of people.


Posted By: loonie
Date Posted: 17 August 2009 at 9:48am
And possibly put a few out of a job LOL

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Team DB


Posted By: colinmono
Date Posted: 17 August 2009 at 1:51pm
Great work, thanks to the author.

Can I be cheeky and ask for some info on recommended glues too?


Posted By: H...
Date Posted: 18 August 2009 at 4:54am
Well done!
 


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Don't worry F$cked up bigger gigs than this one...........


Posted By: minaximal
Date Posted: 19 August 2009 at 1:44pm
spider / surround to base / basket = rubberised lino flooring adhesive (i use dunlop) or contact adhesive

voice coil to cone =  loctite 382 (tack pack) (which is a flexible cyanoacrylate)

dust dome to cone =loctite 4105 (black tack) (which is a flexible cyanoacrylate)


there are other glues like tretobond but i havn't used them, maybe others could add to a list..






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Subs + Barges = :)

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Posted By: Ryan94
Date Posted: 19 August 2009 at 1:49pm
voice coile to cone i used two part epoxy.
 


Posted By: minaximal
Date Posted: 19 August 2009 at 2:05pm
the vc to cone has to be a high temperature glue, as i know someone here who used 2 part epoxies that failed, and i think it was because they were cheap / unsuitable.

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Subs + Barges = :)

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Posted By: Ryan94
Date Posted: 19 August 2009 at 2:08pm
well mines been working fine. but there proberly is better glue out there.


Posted By: norty303
Date Posted: 19 August 2009 at 5:19pm
Evostick impact adhesive for the surround/spider.  It appears to be what beyma supply with their kits

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My laser stuff: http://www.facebook.com/SubsonicSystems" rel="nofollow - http://www.facebook.com/SubsonicSystems
http://www.frikkinlazors.co.uk


Posted By: colinmono
Date Posted: 21 August 2009 at 1:04pm
Thanks for all the glue suggestions so far, much appreciated.


Posted By: Rotorbar
Date Posted: 01 September 2009 at 5:23am
Very good write-up, with an incredible number of details covered.

I've run into a couple of snags over time, and I hope these comments help:

Step 2, Stripping.
I use a heat gun to soften up rubber based cements and then scrape while they are warm.  There's lots less solvents involved, so you retain more brain cells.  Also, the solvent/glue combo sometimes runs all over and makes your work look sloppy.  Also, I often use a rotary wire brush and/or rotary sanding disc for final cleanup of the spider and surround landing areas.

Step 4, Clean-out.
I put a shop vacuum hose on one side of the voice coil gap, and use compressed air to blow out the magnetic gap and magnet pot.  It works pretty well for getting fried varnish from the old voice coil out  Also, if there is rust in the interior of the magnet pot, chances of a successful recone are poor.  Rust may not be iron anymore, but it is still magnetic, and if/when it breaks loose, it will head straight for the gap.  When cleaning the gap with inside-out masking tape, if it comes out dirty, grab more tape and do it again.  Like he said, you get one chance to clean it out.

If the vent screen is old, a patch of polyester furnace filter material makes a nice replacement.  It's tough, and it breathes well.

Step 5, Dry Build.
Before I take the masking tape off of the voice coil gap, I put another layer of tape on top of the existing tape, and then take off both at once.  That way, any magnetic particles that were attracted and on top of the tape stay captive between the tapes.

Voice coil shims (this applies only to "loose parts" recone kits):
I make my own voice coil shims from machine shop type plastic shim stock.  In USA, "Artus" brand is popular and rather cheap.  I also make my voice coil shims "stepped".  The details in this example are specific for a JBL E140 with a WMA kit.  WMA kits (at least those I've bought) consist of all loose parts, except that the surround is glued to the cone.  With loose parts kits, you have to manually center/align the voice coil in all axes.  Magnetically centering the voice coil in the magnetic gap can be difficult.  To help,  I cut two pieces of Artus black (0.012") shim stock 155mm long, and about 40mm wide.  I cut two more strips 155mm long and exactly 16mm wide.  Again, this was for a JBL E140 with a WMA kit.  All dimensions, including shim stock thickness, vary with each speaker.  The math goes like this:  Take the distance from the top of the voice coil former to the midpoint of the voice coil windings.  The midpoint of the windings are the magnetic center of the voice coil.  Then take the thickness of the magnetic top plate and divide by two. This gives you the distance from the top of the plate to the magnetic center of the plate.  Subtracting half the thickness of the magnetic top plate from the voice coil former top-to-center length tells you how much voice coil former is exposed when the voice coil is magnetically centered in the gap.  I pre-curve a wide shim and a narrow shim, lay one on the other, line up two edges, and super-glue them together with the 16mm strip on the inside.  What you end up with is a pre-curved, "stepped" or "shouldered" shim.  When it (the set of two shims, actually) is installed, the 40mm section drops into the magnetic gap and radially centers the voice coil.  The 16mm wide section bottoms out on the inner magnetic top plate, and when the top of the voice coil former is flush with the top of the 16mm section that sticks up, the voice coil is magnetically centered.  It takes care of radial centering, axial centering, and makes it harder to accidentally cock (tilt) the voice coil during installation.  It also prevents you from losing shims into the magnet pot.  That's never happened to me...  Once the spider is glued to the voice coil, I usually remove the voice coil-spider assembly to put glue on the spider landing area, and reinstallation is easy because all you have to do is check that the top of the former is flush with the top of the shim set.  I also smear wax on the shim set so if any voice coil adhesive gets on the shims, they aren't stuck.  This type of shim is re-usable.  I put labels inside them to identify which ones they are.

Step 11, Electrical connections:
I have found the hard way that if your voice coil tinsel leads touch each other during assembly (like when they are glued in place, but not yet soldered to the terminals), when you move the cone, the voice coil will generate current which will try to circulate through the tinsel leads.  Since the tinsel leads are only in incidental contact, the intermittent current will make the speaker sound exactly like a voice coil rub, or as if you have foreign particles in the voice coil gap.  The first time this happens, you'll get this sick feeling as you move the cone and hear that sound.  Before you tear apart your new recone job, check to make sure the tinsel leads aren't touching.

Other:
It is difficult to remember that there is a magnet right there in the middle of the speaker, and one way to get educated is to place a screwdriver or some other tool nearby.  Also, when the job is done, consider buying a demagnetizer for your tools. 

For aesthetics, I cover the back of the magnet pot with several layers of masking tape.  This keeps debris out of the back of the magnet vent, and keeps the back of the magnet from getting scratched up while the driver sits face-up on the bench.  This can be a big issue if your customer is into appearances.  Putting a scrap of carpet on the bench helps, too.  Maybe this is just me, but it seems like when people don't know how to judge something on its technical merits, they tend to fall back on appearances, and then their perception is: poor appearance = bad recone.

I generally run finished drivers at Xmax somewhere near Fs for a while to see how well I performed.

Regards,
Rotorbar



Posted By: Rotorbar
Date Posted: 01 September 2009 at 6:26am
Minor correction: the dimensions on the shims I mentioned were actually for a JBL D130-f.

Regards,
Rotorbar


Posted By: toastyghost
Date Posted: 24 September 2009 at 9:43am
Does anybody have recommendations for re-gluing a surround to the cone where the glue’s failed? I’d rather not have to pay for a recone, let alone ship a heavy ferrite driver somewhere to have it done for me if possible; plus it’s kind of a learning opportunity


Posted By: tallmike
Date Posted: 24 September 2009 at 4:01pm
That's always a fun trick to play, make the tinsel leads touch and move the cone.. watch the reaction :)


Posted By: minaximal
Date Posted: 24 September 2009 at 4:39pm
Originally posted by toastyghost toastyghost wrote:

Does anybody have recommendations for re-gluing a surround to the cone where the glue’s failed? I’d rather not have to pay for a recone, let alone ship a heavy ferrite driver somewhere to have it done for me if possible; plus it’s kind of a learning opportunity


impact adhesive i reckon


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Posted By: toastyghost
Date Posted: 25 September 2009 at 8:01am
Originally posted by minaximal minaximal wrote:


Originally posted by toastyghost toastyghost wrote:

Does anybody have recommendations for re-gluing a surround to the cone where the glue’s failed? I’d rather not have to pay for a recone, let alone ship a heavy ferrite driver somewhere to have it done for me if possible; plus it’s kind of a learning opportunity
impact adhesive i reckon


Thanks, any tips on application? Pallet knife perhaps?


Posted By: minaximal
Date Posted: 25 September 2009 at 12:25pm
Originally posted by toastyghost toastyghost wrote:



Thanks, any tips on application? Pallet knife perhaps?


a shim sized bit of card is easiest, to help you stop smearing glue everywhere you dont want it.


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Subs + Barges = :)

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Posted By: thepersonunknown
Date Posted: 30 November 2009 at 7:05pm
excelent thread. proper use full information. Clap
+ one on thie becoming a clasic, least it be lost amongst the obscurity of old posts


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looking for Crown MA amps.


Posted By: kedwardsleisure
Date Posted: 18 January 2010 at 10:42pm
The nicest glue Ive used is the stuff JBL supply as an all-purpose speaker cement for both spider to basket, surround to basket and dustcap to cone. It is black, tacky but slippy, and flexible. It is also gap-filling (makes nice beads for the cap) and shiny if set in air.
It's made by the american company Moyen, part number RS3087.

Loctite in the UK make adhesives suitable for loudspeaker repair/manufacturer according to their web applications guide, however I'd love to know if they have a direct equivalent to the ubiquitous jbl stuff as its so nice to use.




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K. Edwards Electronics Engineers

North Staffordshire



Posted By: dave1
Date Posted: 27 January 2010 at 9:48am
Smile thankyou Star


Posted By: markie
Date Posted: 26 February 2010 at 11:45am
I found this on you tube, it's a vid of "how to re-cone" from a U.S. company that makes kits. WELL worth the 10 mins to watch it.
 
http://www.soundspeakerrepair.com/speaker-parts-p/Reconing-Video-Instructions-EV/EV-Kits - http://www.soundspeakerrepair.com/speaker-parts-p/Reconing-Video-Instructions-EV/EV-Kits


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If it's got wheels or tits it's gonna cost a fortune


Posted By: in2deep
Date Posted: 01 April 2010 at 11:06am
That could come in very handy as I have a habit of frying JBL speakers every so often :D

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If it ain't loud...it ain't worth it!!!


Posted By: CHAMPION
Date Posted: 11 April 2010 at 8:03pm
http://forum.speakerplans.com/reconing-guide-pics_topic37885.html - http://forum.speakerplans.com/reconing-guide-pics_topic37885.html

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Sticks n Stones


Posted By: CHAMPION
Date Posted: 12 April 2010 at 8:26am
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VN0tmyyC0ak&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VN0tmyyC0ak&feature=related

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Sticks n Stones


Posted By: brokenjoe
Date Posted: 12 April 2010 at 8:51am
Originally posted by CHAMPION CHAMPION wrote:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VN0tmyyC0ak&feature=related - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VN0tmyyC0ak&feature=related



good find.. very interesting!


Posted By: cravings
Date Posted: 13 August 2010 at 4:37pm
i'll be doing my first recone very soon, a fane collosus 15b. i'm missing the foam filter from the vent in the back.. i presume improvising some other foam that will serve as a dust filter yet still allow air to flow easily through will do? other drivers i have have fairly open metal grills in this spot.

any quick suggestions for a tiny amount of foam?


Posted By: markie
Date Posted: 13 August 2010 at 5:11pm
You need open cell foam, I think it's usually 20ppi. I'll drop a piece in the post to you.
 
M


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If it's got wheels or tits it's gonna cost a fortune


Posted By: cravings
Date Posted: 13 August 2010 at 8:04pm
wow, very kind, markie. i'll probably hit you for a few more grills in the next few months. not right now though.


Posted By: dj scratchy
Date Posted: 24 August 2010 at 5:15pm
hi there ppl i have a beyma 15 g350 i think it needs a recone its scraping and sounds nasty can the magnet be unscrewed so i can clean the coil gap or do i need to recone it if i do need to recone it where would i go about finding a recone kit and can any one on here do it for me lol and how much will it cost
 
cheers


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sound, light, trilite, stage decks, complete stage packages indoor and outdoor 07568188104 sl systems sound&light


Posted By: cravings
Date Posted: 27 August 2010 at 4:14pm
Originally posted by markie markie wrote:

You need open cell foam, I think it's usually 20ppi. I'll drop a piece in the post to you.
 

M




he did indeed!

thanks very much markie, arrived today. you're too kind.

^^ service, people, right there.


Posted By: goonerman
Date Posted: 21 October 2010 at 5:50pm
Must say that I found this recone guide invaluable information for my first attempt at a recone, I have just reconed an 18" Omega Pro, of which I am very pleased with the result.
 
The kit from Eminence was a lose parts one which doesn't come with any shims or anything other than the bare bones.  The info from Rotobars post was really comprehensive for making your own shims and was an ideal way to make sure that the v.c was centred on both axis.
 
My biggest problem was deciding on what glue to use!! after days of searching and dithering I finally decided to go for Evostick's new seriously strong glue.  It starts to go off after 3 mins, sets in 2 hours and is at full strength after 24hrs, it also dries clear.  So intially you do get a bit of time for any adjustments as long as it's not anything major!! All in all I found it to be a good glue especially as after a real good pounding the speaker is still all held together RESULT !!
 


Posted By: SBC
Date Posted: 27 November 2010 at 10:50pm
cheapest place for loctite 4105? 

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F.T.S.S.


Posted By: SBC
Date Posted: 28 November 2010 at 6:05pm
?

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F.T.S.S.


Posted By: rosslewis
Date Posted: 26 January 2011 at 1:16pm
Brilliant guide. Thanks for that.


Posted By: tone107
Date Posted: 27 January 2011 at 11:00pm
thamks for the guide


Posted By: Parkend10
Date Posted: 23 February 2011 at 10:24pm
This has probably come up before but I can't find it here. Does anyone know where to get silver (aluminium) replacement dust caps from? Gold effect ones would also be handy. 

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HH Concert Radial x 4
HH PRO 200 x 8
HH Concert Bass x 8
HH VX 1200PDC x 8
DBX Driverack, Behringer DCX2496, Behringer X32, HH Queensberry, HH MISCARA


Posted By: roar-soundsdjs
Date Posted: 16 March 2011 at 6:03pm
ClapClapThanks Very helpful....now to recone my Byma drivers.....lool


Posted By: Calculus
Date Posted: 24 April 2011 at 6:41pm
so when you've tried tape rolled up and it still doesn't get the bits out and you then tried the vacum cleaner on getting the bits of magnetised metal out of the voice coil gap... then what do you do????? I've been trying to get some bits out for 4 hours now.... they just don't want to stick to the tape...
???????????


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Always a compromise, You can't have everything...

Where would you put it all.


Posted By: cravings
Date Posted: 24 April 2011 at 9:56pm
the only time i've done it, i used masking tape wrapped around cardboard.. as thick as i could possibly get it to go in... and as they've said here.. just went round and round and round for ages getting out little bits at a time till nothing else was coming out at all... think that's all you can do...


Posted By: Calculus
Date Posted: 25 April 2011 at 1:05am
yeah i'll just persist... or maybe blast it with air.... either way i'll win eventually...

-------------
Always a compromise, You can't have everything...

Where would you put it all.


Posted By: Calculus
Date Posted: 25 April 2011 at 6:41pm
A day of persistance has lead to 4 newly reconed V1000s =Smile Was much more carefull when doing the other 3 not to let anything in the gap... Found that while taped over the gap you can put the hoover in the middle and over the gap round it and suck out loads of junk that way too...

-------------
Always a compromise, You can't have everything...

Where would you put it all.


Posted By: Wizard Audio
Date Posted: 09 May 2011 at 2:14pm
Great post!


Posted By: speakerguy559
Date Posted: 17 June 2011 at 10:45pm
any1 up for the job of reconing some pd 2150s?


Posted By: CHAMPION
Date Posted: 17 June 2011 at 11:00pm
Volt re-coning ..............



http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?pid=18654631&id=572315166" rel="nofollow">



http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?pid=18654631&id=572315166" rel="nofollow">


-------------
Sticks n Stones


Posted By: CHAMPION
Date Posted: 17 June 2011 at 11:01pm
My Favourite recone is going to be a PD or Fane  

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Sticks n Stones


Posted By: speakerguy559
Date Posted: 17 June 2011 at 11:03pm
as somebody whos never reconed before would you recommend i pay somebody else to do this who knows what they are doing..... or go for it... with the potential of killing my speaker lol


Posted By: CHAMPION
Date Posted: 17 June 2011 at 11:13pm
as its speakerplans .....ask someone to perform a re-cone with you so that you can witness how to do it properly  

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Sticks n Stones


Posted By: dubclot
Date Posted: 19 June 2011 at 4:44pm
Is there someone on here that offers a recone service?  with PD drivers in mind


Posted By: CHAMPION
Date Posted: 19 June 2011 at 5:21pm
i  am happy to help / recone for you, please pm me

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Sticks n Stones


Posted By: haloweenhamster
Date Posted: 18 July 2011 at 12:36am
Hi a had a driver that started rubbing after being left in a garage, carefully removed cone and there a scratch in the enamel, does anyone know if it will be ok to leave it exposed or know what the best thing to coat it in?
cheers
HH

ps there is no sign of heat damage so my thought is to use the same cone as its not bunt out

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2x court top horn 2" + 1" loaded
2x court mid horn 12" loaded
2x ass mt1200 10" + 2" + bullets
2x court W bins 15" loaded
1x/3x TAS sub 18" loaded


Posted By: MattyG
Date Posted: 25 July 2011 at 2:55pm
That's a great guide, very professional. Thanks


Posted By: desolation
Date Posted: 27 July 2011 at 3:51pm
very helpful topic :)


Posted By: Engineer
Date Posted: 29 September 2011 at 2:58am
Thank you, very informative.



Posted By: Maff_c
Date Posted: 07 October 2011 at 11:19pm
Very good topic.. Cheers


Posted By: frankie funbags
Date Posted: 19 October 2011 at 9:35am
a bit of a newbie question...... can u repair a fane 18xb 4ohm driver with a 8ohm recone kit?? i know the rcf drivers r cross compatible but i cannot find definitive info regarding fane drivers


Posted By: cryz2
Date Posted: 22 October 2011 at 11:48am
HF
Repair guide might come in handy
as it has photos of sorts

http://www.film-tech.com/warehouse/manuals/ALTEC902908.pdf


-------------
Force one sound system


Posted By: frankie funbags
Date Posted: 14 December 2011 at 10:24am
am on the verge o buyin some fane 18xb 8ohm recone kits to put in some fane18xb 4ohm baskets, would really like to be sure this wont be a waste o dollar as i aint rollin in it lol, the wire wil be thinner so i assumin it wil fit but not sure if thats how it works, i will be very gratefull for ne advise ne1 has


Posted By: CHAMPION
Date Posted: 14 December 2011 at 10:49am
No problems in doing so, drop in that 4ohm coil 

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Sticks n Stones


Posted By: frankie funbags
Date Posted: 14 December 2011 at 11:24am
its an 8ohm coil i puttin in a 4ohm basket, that stil ok?


Posted By: CHAMPION
Date Posted: 14 December 2011 at 11:28am
Yes no probs, if you want to be absolutely sure, call up Fane and ask Suzan.

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Sticks n Stones


Posted By: frankie funbags
Date Posted: 14 December 2011 at 4:40pm
just spoke wid fane n they confirmed, thx champion


Posted By: HighGradeBlazer
Date Posted: 17 December 2011 at 6:13pm
Very helpful...thanks :)


Posted By: Brummiejon
Date Posted: 03 January 2012 at 2:19pm
Hi
 
Just reconed two PD154's using this guide... they sounded awesome in the HD15 cabs on NYE 2011.
I used bostick impact adhesive (from advice from an american recone article) for the spider, surround and dust cap, all seems fine so far... lets see if its still all holding up in 12 months time.....
 
Cheers for the advice, really useful and the recone was easy..... i'm now offering recone services in Kent if anyone is interested.....
 
*BJ*


Posted By: streetsounds
Date Posted: 30 April 2012 at 9:18am
If you could check this out on facebook, i took some photos when i did the reconing of my burnt SD18EL
https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.2718788331049.2118760.1297253011&type=3


-------------
Bass matters...


Posted By: dj elite
Date Posted: 08 July 2012 at 9:44pm
Very helpful indeed considering the amount i thrown out in the past.


Posted By: el_dj
Date Posted: 24 July 2012 at 5:23pm
didn't this post use to have pictures? can anybody reupload them?

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Old twat, with an interest in light & sound



Posted By: detergent
Date Posted: 02 September 2012 at 2:42pm


Posted By: SineMetric
Date Posted: 23 September 2012 at 8:27am
Can i get this in hardback....??


Posted By: enginearin
Date Posted: 11 October 2012 at 5:20pm
Excellent guide, thanks Clap


Posted By: matt13
Date Posted: 19 November 2012 at 3:05pm
this is a great help.


Posted By: superspunk
Date Posted: 21 November 2012 at 4:53pm
Great..!


Posted By: Steve Noisy Toys
Date Posted: 09 December 2012 at 9:57pm
very useful been trying to find advice on this for ages. anyone know where to get beyma recone kits for less than nearly-as-much-as-the-piggin-driver? or are they just pricey everywhere?



Posted By: Sabbelbacke
Date Posted: 10 December 2012 at 12:04pm
Yes, they are expensive. There are "Aftermarket" Kits around, but in my experience they don´t match the quality of the original. Look in the states für aftermarket Kits. 


Posted By: Earplug
Date Posted: 10 December 2012 at 2:04pm
Originally posted by Steve Noisy Toys Steve Noisy Toys wrote:

very useful been trying to find advice on this for ages. anyone know where to get beyma recone kits for less than nearly-as-much-as-the-piggin-driver? or are they just pricey everywhere?



What are you after?




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Earplugs Are For Wimps!


Posted By: Sabbelbacke
Date Posted: 10 December 2012 at 6:17pm
@Earplug
Do you have some? I´d be needing 10G200 and 18G550 ...


Posted By: Earplug
Date Posted: 10 December 2012 at 6:30pm
How many of each?




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Earplugs Are For Wimps!


Posted By: Sabbelbacke
Date Posted: 10 December 2012 at 7:15pm
3 x 10g200
1 x 18g550
1 x 12g320


Posted By: Earplug
Date Posted: 11 December 2012 at 1:36pm
Ok, I´ll check for you.




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Earplugs Are For Wimps!


Posted By: Sabbelbacke
Date Posted: 11 December 2012 at 8:21pm
merci


Posted By: RMS
Date Posted: 20 December 2012 at 9:34pm
I find it cheaper to repair the voice coil unless the cone need replacing.

-------------
Over 90% of your items say "MADE IN CHINA"


Posted By: Earplug
Date Posted: 21 December 2012 at 10:22am
Sorry, still no news from Beyma - I´ll get on to them again today, but being a Friday - and end of the world Smile, there´s most probably no one there...  Disapprove




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Earplugs Are For Wimps!


Posted By: Sabbelbacke
Date Posted: 21 December 2012 at 12:05pm
Spain is more to the west, probably the world already ended there :)


Posted By: Earplug
Date Posted: 21 December 2012 at 1:54pm
Spain is just to the south of me (in Cataluña at the moment) - but yes...  Smile

TBH, I´ve been kept waiting for months sometimes for a reply from some of the sound companies here - it´s very frustrating. Disapprove




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Earplugs Are For Wimps!


Posted By: Sabbelbacke
Date Posted: 27 December 2012 at 9:53pm
@earplug
I got a message that you sent me a PN, but somehow, I can´t access and write PNs in this Forum. Maybe not enough posts ? Could you send me an email? 


Posted By: Earplug
Date Posted: 28 December 2012 at 8:35am
I think you need 10 posts, so just 1 to go....  Smile




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Earplugs Are For Wimps!


Posted By: Sabbelbacke
Date Posted: 28 December 2012 at 8:39am
No Problem :) 
We ran out of "sticky stuff" for the surroundings, our previous supplier shut down. Does anybody have a hint for the fabric surroundings? (Yes, Beyma et all have stuff available, but its much too expensive...)


Posted By: Earplug
Date Posted: 28 December 2012 at 8:43am
I´ve used these people:

http://www.simplyspeakers.com/standard-speaker-repair-foam-edge-kits.html" rel="nofollow - http://www.simplyspeakers.com/standard-speaker-repair-foam-edge-kits.html




-------------
Earplugs Are For Wimps!


Posted By: midas
Date Posted: 28 December 2012 at 5:18pm
Now if they were in the UK that would be excellent...


Posted By: Earplug
Date Posted: 28 December 2012 at 5:22pm
What you need is a friend in the US who can send them on as a (tax-free) gift, etc.  Wink





-------------
Earplugs Are For Wimps!


Posted By: midas
Date Posted: 28 December 2012 at 11:50pm
I have used this before to stick a spoiler on the roof of my old Subaru, it was one of the high level rear window spoilers. I used a small bead about 5mm thick 60mm long, so not very much.

Called Sika flex, super strong cured over night.

Which was no mean feat as it was 312bhp and topped out of revs at 140mph. 

Is it worth trying on a cone? 


http://www.uksealants.co.uk/sikaflex-11fc+-adhesive-and-sealant-300ml--p209.html



Posted By: Sabbelbacke
Date Posted: 29 December 2012 at 10:43am
I have Sikaflex here, its fine as a glue for glueing the cone to the gasket. But as a lubricant for the surrounding I´d guess it´s too thick and viscous.


Posted By: Muckerbarnes1
Date Posted: 10 January 2013 at 10:37pm
I had this email ( which is global and ok to use) From Beyma today about the glus supplied ( Evo Stick), so only old kits will now have glue. Hope this helps someone;
 

Moncada, Jannuary 10th 2013

Dear Partners,

We have decided to remove the tube of glue included in the recone kits for repairing cone

speakers. This decision has been taken mainly to comply with current regulations (REACH) and

also because in many cases the state of the glue was not correct in the moment of repairing

giving no added value to include it. Please note this component is not difficult to be found in the

market.

We will update the recone procedure note included in the kits as well as in the web site,

indicating the type of glue that must be acquired for doing a correct job. For your reference it is

contact glue, rubber type.

Please do not hesitate to contact us for further information.

Sincerely,

Jorge Serrano



-------------
Billy Dawg.


Posted By: madsound
Date Posted: 25 March 2013 at 9:14am
nice post


Posted By: Awesomesound99
Date Posted: 10 June 2013 at 9:42pm
Awesome guide, very useful!


Posted By: APC321
Date Posted: 27 August 2013 at 5:17pm
Just discovered the recone guide. Very useful source of info.


Posted By: cass ent
Date Posted: 13 February 2014 at 8:51pm
This is very informative . My advice to any pa enthusiast / bass junky / speaker freak , is to give it a go . I did my first recone 11 years ago on a fane colossus 15xb and I've never looked back since . I've done over 500 recones / foam edge repairs now and it can be very addictive ! I'll get baskets just to repair them sometimes( it beats an airfix kit any day)

Some clone kits require abit of prep work but I never rule them out as you can save a hell of a lot of wedge over a genuine kit and to be honest you would be hard pressed to tell the difference in tonal quality and most of the time physical look.


Posted By: Jubone
Date Posted: 21 May 2014 at 5:37pm
Hi there,Thanks very much for the info.I'm doing a recone myself to an old Celestion 18" bass driver that has had a rattle since buying it on ebay,It's part of a Tannoy B950 cab. I waited for the kit to arrive before stripping out the software on the driver. As soon as I had removed the old cone assembly I covered the voice coil gap with tape and spent a good few hours preping the driver for the new software, when I finally removed the tape to clean the gap I noticed that the gap is slightly offset. To verify my visual observations I put several of the shims together so they was a snug fit in the gap and ran round 360 degrees, and sure enough it got tighter on one side. So I imagine that it is game over for this driver, and it would be a waste of a recone kit to confirm my suspicions? Any suggestions would be welcome.

http://s1337.photobucket.com/user/judetrim/media/IMG_0970_zps31ae94b7.jpg.html" rel="nofollow">



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