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Conanski View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Conanski Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 September 2020 at 5:24pm
Originally posted by MarcoAudio MarcoAudio wrote:

I plug external sources like phones etc into the microphone line into mixer using a 3.5 adapter with a long lead. Get good results that way.

Unless your mic input isn't balanced the results you get connecting that way are going to vary wildy depending upon the source recording, I suggest you try the cable style suggest in this thread and compare the results, I think you will discover your way doesn't work nearly as well as you think it does.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote JonB67 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 September 2020 at 9:38pm
To be fair he doesn't say what he's using into the mixer,  i suspect 3.5 to 2x1/4" or 2xRCA. Surely can't be many using 3.5 to xlr, it makes no sense. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Conanski Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 September 2020 at 11:21pm
Originally posted by JonB67 JonB67 wrote:

To be fair he doesn't say what he's using into the mixer,  i suspect 3.5 to 2x1/4" or 2xRCA. Surely can't be many using 3.5 to xlr, it makes no sense. 

A 1/4" to 1/8" TRS adapter and an XLR to TRS cable are easy to find so it wouldn't take much effort to put together what looks like(but isn't) a valid solution. 


Edited by Conanski - 16 September 2020 at 11:23pm
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote bin juice24 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 September 2020 at 12:09pm
Apologies for not updating this thread. My cable has arrived but I haven’t had time to test it, busy with work.
I’ll definitely try it this evening. It’s Thursday after all. Good for playing som Gong.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote bin juice24 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 September 2020 at 5:31pm
Plugged in the y cable and tada!

I could swear that I saw it up in the sky
On the eve but I never knew they could fly
It was green as an emerald in the blue
Now I'm wondering if it was really you


Thanks again for your input.


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote snowflake Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 September 2020 at 6:50pm
Originally posted by BJtheDJ BJtheDJ wrote:

Originally posted by Conanski Conanski wrote:

Originally posted by BJtheDJ BJtheDJ wrote:

Sorry my friend, but (with the greatest of respect and not trying to insult you) you're just plain wrong there, 

Go lookup how a balanced circuits work and then tell me how I'm wrong.



OK.  I don't have to look it up.  You're wrong.

What you illustrate above is a balanced circuit (balanced circuits are always mono), and completely different to the circuit in question.

The OP has a stereo signal composed of two channels of unbalanced audio.

A balanced signal and a stereo signal are two completely different things, although you can have stereo balanced signals they'd need at least 5 connections (a pair of balanced connections for each channel and a common ground connection) to work properly - not the three that are in question here.

A balanced signal is a mono signal that has two components in anti-phase which are summed with each other, because of that any noise picked up is identical in both sides of the circuit and then cancels itself in the summing amplifier or the transformer (whichever is in use) of the input.

An unbalanced signal has a signal wire and a ground wire as illustrated by you in the picture that you posted in https://forum.speakerplans.com/forum_posts.asp?TID=105701&PID=1046793&title=steve-hillage#1046793 where it can be clearly seen that that the two jacks are not not balanced.

Even if both of those were inserted into the same channel of an amplifier then they would still be in phase and would not cancel but would instead be summed.


a balanced system doesn't sum the two signals, it takes the difference between the hot and cold signals resulting in +6dB and cancellation of inteference. if you put a left and a right stereo signal into a balanced input instead of hot and cold (inverted) then difference between them will cancel out most of the signal.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote fatfreddiescat Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 September 2020 at 8:13pm
Originally posted by snowflake snowflake wrote:

Originally posted by BJtheDJ BJtheDJ wrote:

Originally posted by Conanski Conanski wrote:

Originally posted by BJtheDJ BJtheDJ wrote:

Sorry my friend, but (with the greatest of respect and not trying to insult you) you're just plain wrong there, 

Go lookup how a balanced circuits work and then tell me how I'm wrong.



OK.  I don't have to look it up.  You're wrong.

What you illustrate above is a balanced circuit (balanced circuits are always mono), and completely different to the circuit in question.

The OP has a stereo signal composed of two channels of unbalanced audio.

A balanced signal and a stereo signal are two completely different things, although you can have stereo balanced signals they'd need at least 5 connections (a pair of balanced connections for each channel and a common ground connection) to work properly - not the three that are in question here.

A balanced signal is a mono signal that has two components in anti-phase which are summed with each other, because of that any noise picked up is identical in both sides of the circuit and then cancels itself in the summing amplifier or the transformer (whichever is in use) of the input.

An unbalanced signal has a signal wire and a ground wire as illustrated by you in the picture that you posted in https://forum.speakerplans.com/forum_posts.asp?TID=105701&PID=1046793&title=steve-hillage#1046793 where it can be clearly seen that that the two jacks are not not balanced.

Even if both of those were inserted into the same channel of an amplifier then they would still be in phase and would not cancel but would instead be summed.


a balanced system doesn't sum the two signals, it takes the difference between the hot and cold signals resulting in +6dB

It will add to 6dB with a differential output but not always with a balanced output, balanced just means that the two lines are impedance matched, there may only be a signal on one line which is fairly common as is cheap but effective.
Plugging L and R into a differential input still holds true re cancellation or addition, depending on whether one of the lines from the source is inverted or not.
 


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